STAR WARS SHADOWS OF THE EMPIRE EBOOK

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Editorial Reviews. From Library Journal. Xizor, the Dark Prince and underlord of the criminal site Store · site eBooks · Literature & Fiction. Shadows of the Empire illuminates the shadowy outlines of a criminal conspiracy that exists in the background of the events in the movies, ruled by a character. Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire PDF Download or read online here in PDF or information and details about Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire eBook Epub.


Star Wars Shadows Of The Empire Ebook

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Compre Shadows of the Empire: Star Wars Legends (Star Wars - Legends) ( English Edition) de Steve Perry na lapacalases.tk Confira também os eBooks mais. Read "Shadows of the Empire: Star Wars Legends" by Steve Perry available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. Shadows of. download the Kobo ebook Book Star Wars Omnibus by Steve Perry at lapacalases.tk, Canada's largest bookstore. + Get Free Shipping on Graphic Novels.

While the server was handling the HTML code pretty well, downloads were only completing about half the time. This was getting to be a hassle, as was the week where the site was down for an unknown reason. Also, space started to become an issue, prohibiting me from putting up lots of pictures and graphics.

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Thus, I took a sabbatical from MosEisley. Amazingly, I found one almost immediately at TheForce. They agreed to give me a ton of space and all the help I needed. Net had already recognized my encyclopedia as a cool site, and now it was on its way to become the Star Wars encyclopedia on the Internet.

This is the first edition with TheForce. Net, and I hope it reaches new and existing readers with more ease than ever. Thanks to readers like you, I've been transferring well over 4 Gigabytes of data each month! I'm also indebted to the readers who have written back, pointing out problems and offering suggestions, in an effort to make this the most complete and comprehensive encyclopedia available!

I rally do enjoy reading your correspondences and answering your questions. Keep 'em coming! It is impossible to create a document like this from such a huge body of knowledge without finding some inconsistencies and errors. Every author who has written in the Star Wars universe has commented on it and dealt with it. Lucasfilm has final say on the material I drew from, and it makes no claim that the material is percent compatible with George Lucas' vision of the Star Wars universe.

So, if there are errors or inconsistencies, I have tried to note them as appropriate.

PDF Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire Limited Edition EBook

It is important to note that this massive work could not have been completed like it will ever be complete! They are all noted in the Acknowledgements section.

I just hope i didn't leave anyone out! I have also tried to document the source of my encyclopedia entries at all times.

The bibliography at the end of this encyclopedia is quite extensive, and I have tried to indicate with each entry which source it came from. If an entry is not sourced, it means that I could not remember where I found it. If you find an unsourced or inaccurately sourced entry, please e-mail me!. We have space battles, attempted murders, lightsaber battles, rescues, kidnappings, etc. One of the better Star Wars novels out there, Shadows of the Empire is entertaining but not hugely memorable.

Not a bad book to put on your reading list, but I wouldn't rush out to read it anytime soon. View 1 comment. Jun 05, Siria rated it liked it Shelves: All the furore over the release of Episode III has made me go back and search out some of the Star Wars Extended Universe novels that I devoured so furiously when I was a kid, out of the hope that immersing myself in the Original Trilogy and the books based around it would help block out some of the pain caused by the prequels.

They're essentially glorified, sanctioned fanfiction - though the ten-through-twelve-year-old version of me didn't know that. Shadows of the Empire was one of my favourit All the furore over the release of Episode III has made me go back and search out some of the Star Wars Extended Universe novels that I devoured so furiously when I was a kid, out of the hope that immersing myself in the Original Trilogy and the books based around it would help block out some of the pain caused by the prequels.

Shadows of the Empire was one of my favourites at the time, and I was curious to see how it would stand up re-reading it so many years later. To put it bluntly: Re-reading it with the knowledge of what fanfiction is in my mind, it really does seem more than ever like one.

It even fulfils a role which a lot of fanfic takes on - filling in events which take place 'off-screen' in canon, the background events which we don't get to see. The book itself is set between Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, and tells the story of the first failed attempt to rescue Han.

The pacing is as fast and the action as non-stop as the movies, helping to pull along the plot, which aspires to the Machiavellian, but which really ends up achieving only the political acumen which one could imagine the bastard love child of Blair and Bush possessing.

The characterisation is mostly good, too, with the addition of some new OCs - Guri the assassin femme fetale droid, whom I quite like ; Prince Xizor the mostly fun-in-a-ahahaomgwtf! The expansion of the canonical universe I especially liked - particularly the parts where we get to see something of how the Empire operated on a day-to-day basis.

The dialogue, however, is choppy, and often reads more like a screen-play than a novel. The exposition too often seems forced - something which seems especially irksome when you consider that the number of people reading this who don't have a fairly good knowledge of the Star Wars universe will more than probably be extremely low. All in all, though, it's a fun read if you have an hour or two to spare and want to switch your brain off.

If Star Wars is a popcorn kind of movie, this is a popcorn kind of book. Mar 16, Lance Shadow rated it liked it Shelves: Anyways, on to the book itself. This was an entire multimedia project created by Lucasfilm in with collaboration between Bantam Books, Lucasarts, and Dark Horse Comics to create a massive but intimately woven story that chronicles the gap between The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. Different parts of this story are told in the various pieces of media that are part of it.

The book, which I am reviewing here, showcases the central characters of the Original Trilogy and what they were going through during this time- as well as how they were dealing with the absence of Han Solo. Luke Skywalker, Leia Organa, and Lando Calrissian work to get the rebels back on their feet, as well as to find and rescue Han.

Leia decides to seek out the Black Sun criminal syndicate for help, but gets far more than what she was bargaining for in its leader, Prince Xizor. The team also enlists Dash Rendar for an extra blaster. Meanwhile, Prince Xizor has greater ambitions and a thirst for revenge as he plots to take Darth Vader's place by killing Luke Skywalker and humiliating him.

At the same time, Darth Vader continues his quest to capture Luke alive and turn him to the Dark Side- as well as show Xizor who's boss. Shadows of the Empire is a bit of a mixed bag, so lets get the bad stuff out of the way first. Starting with Dash Rendar, I found him to be pretty stereotypical and cliche.

He is written here as an even more extreme version of Han: Maybe Dash Rendar works better as a protagonist for the video game, but here he just clutters up the story. Guri is a character that isn't just bland, she doesn't even feel like Star Wars.

I've been willing to accept quite a few concepts that have been strange and "out there" for star wars, but the human replica droid is the first that seemingly falls within all the rules established in this universe but still doesn't quite fit. Even if she weren't a human replica droid, Guri is not interesting at all, and quite a Mary Sue- the book emphasizes her impeccable beauty, unwavering loyalty, and unbeatable strength without giving her any sort of flaws.

And Xizor Perry writes him as such a Gary Stu to the point where it's ridiculous, on top of a cringeworthy subplot where he has the hots for Leia. He would have been a better character had Perry written him with more restraint, but I think he tried to hard to make Xizor intimidating by telling us how unbeatable he is in every regard.

The writing works well in most places, but I recommend skimming if not outright skipping between roughly pages ; I don't remember ever cringing any more than what I had to endure with those scenes, to the point where I almost threw up at how sickening it was.

I'm not sure whether I was supposed to feel aroused or dirty, but The shower scene in Solo was more erotic! Heck, I'd probably have a better chance of feeling uncomfortable in the right way reading 50 shades of Grey! You know what, I need to move on here, because the sooner I forget about what I had to suffer through there, the better.

Despite the glaring problems, Steve Perry does an incredible job on many of the other aspects of the book. The best parts of this novel are easily the familiar characters. Perry's portrayals of Luke, Leia, Lando, and Vader are all spot on- and fairly nuanced. With all of these characters, their personalities are perfectly in line with the Original Trilogy, and Perry does a fantastic job addressing everything that has happened to them in A new Hope and Empire Strikes Back.

Luke has been shaken by his encounter with Darth Vader, and his confidence in himself is been shattered. Luke's little journey in this book as he tries to reconnect with the force and strengthen his bond with it is both highly compelling and very interesting to read about. I loved the bit where he works to build himself a new lightsaber.

It may be outdated because of how The Clone Wars series, even before the canon reset, changed how building a lightsaber is done especially the nature of the lightsaber crystal but I can forgive that here because this book was written over a decade before those episodes of The Clone Wars came out.

I also liked how vulnerable Perry made Luke here, allowing for the situations he gets into feel much more dangerous and exciting for the reader even though we know he will survive. Leia is done especially well, and is probably the best character in the book. The loss of Han Solo has deeply affected her and has left her in a highly vulnerable emotional state. As disgusting as the scenes between Leia and Xizor ended up being, Leia's portrayal was compelling, and serves to increase the complexity of her character.

That strong will we associate with Leia is there, but she's not infallible, and Perry strikes a perfect balance. I also highly commend Perry for addressing Leia's complicated feelings for Luke.

But Perry addresses it here during the sections where Leia has her point of view, without worrying about it coming off as incestuous. In the end, I thought Perry handled it quite gracefully. Lando works great here, and I wish they didn't also team up with Dash Rendar because of it. Lando serves as a Han Solo stand-in like Dash when it comes to the team dynamic, but I think he's written much better.

I also like how Perry doesn't just throw in a snarky line from Lando in every single conversation something that I felt like happened with Dash , but when he does, it feels like something that distinctly Lando would say. Also, not every line from Lando is intended to be a funny one-liner; although when he DOES throw a comedic one-liner, it almost always sticks the landing.

I really liked Darth Vader in this book. He doesn't get as much page time as the other familiar characters, but when he does, it's a treat. Vader's characterization is in line with what we know of him in the original trilogy; badass and evil. Perry also does a surprisingly good job making you feel the fear that Vader's comrades feel when they are in his presence.

However, I think the emotional baggage is handled perfectly- it increases the complexity in Vader as a character without getting in the way of his intimidating side. Perry puts quite a bit of focus on Vader's desire to please his master, as well as his frustrations of dealing with a rival in Prince Xizor.

Other supporting characters from the original trilogy are handled well in this book too. Chewie is fun, and Perry does a good job with giving him some personality that stays consistent with what we know from Chewie in epsisodes 4, 5, and 6. All of these characters were compelling and consistent with their portrayals in the Original Trilogy. For the most part, Steve Perry does a good job with the writing.

There isn't that strong of a central story here, but he manages to weave all of the characters' individual stories together into a fairly cohesive narrative that effectively and compellingly showcases what was going on in between episodes 5 and 6.

The action scenes were also quite enjoyable- Perry is able to write action that has enough to provide a basic idea of what is happening but still manages to make the sequences feel fast paced. There's plenty of action scenes to be had in these pages, and pretty much all of them are highlights of the novel. Final rating is 3. Shadows of the Empire has many problems and doesn't fully hold up, but the stuff that's actually good is truly fantastic.

The classic characters are fairly compelling and the action scenes are a lot of fun, even if the new characters ranged from mediocre to terrible. The stuff with Leia and Xizor is truly painful to get through, but if you can stomach that the rest of the book is a fast and easy read. I haven't experienced the entire multimedia project for Shadows of the Empire but this novel feels self contained enough that I think it can be enjoyed without playing the N64 game or reading the comic.

I would definitely skip the sections with Leia and Xizor between page or so, but I would recommend the rest of the book to those who are interested in exploring the legends continuity.

Aug 11, Venus Maneater rated it really liked it Shelves: Rated by my SO, who likes it because Xizor makes a pretty awesome villain, and Dash Rendar is all kinds of awesome.

It answers some questions, fills up some lost time between Empire and Return, and features most of the SW movie cast. Jan 18, Shannon rated it did not like it Shelves: I lasted through 40 pages or so of this novel.

The concept sounded interesting; a rival vs Darth Vader for the affections of the Emperor. But the problem is that the concept wasn't fully mined nor not even partially enough to make it interesting enough.

Furthermore, every other chapter jumped to the Star Wars characters in which they rehashed stuff from the movies just like the crime lord character who was opposed to Vader. I get that he hates Vader but do I have to hear it for pages and pages of I lasted through 40 pages or so of this novel. I get that he hates Vader but do I have to hear it for pages and pages of internal thoughts? Moreover, half of what Vader and the Emperor talk about is. No thank you.

C minus. View 2 comments. Sep 26, Einzige rated it really liked it Shelves: A rather charming satire of that confusing but important event for Catholics - Vatician II. The book's Starwars setting makes what would otherwise be a technical and dry matter quite fun.

Hence you have Yves Cognar represented by Xizor who literally runs a criminal organisation named the Black Sun battling for influence and control against a Re A rather charming satire of that confusing but important event for Catholics - Vatician II. Hence you have Yves Cognar represented by Xizor who literally runs a criminal organisation named the Black Sun battling for influence and control against a Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange Darth Vader with a focus on the Liturgy which is cleverly represented by Luke Skywalker.

This means you get things like Cognar's famous rebuke of a conservative priest at the council being transformed into Xizor beating up a muscle-bound assassin and Garrigou-Lagrange's blistering critique of modernist theology in the Humani generis being shown as a space battle which destroys the palace of modernism.

Of course whilst this all well and good Perry has taken some liberties and suffered from a few holes - notably with Garrigou-Lagrange presence and probably would have benefited from Cardinal Cognars Journals which were published a few years after this was written.

Still a quirky satire that is worthwhile if only for its novelty whilst still being an acceptable read to those who dont have an interest in the development of Catholic theology or ecclesiastical politics. Jan 09, Paul Darcy rated it liked it Shelves: As you recall Han is kinda frozen, Luke is not quite done his training and Lando has possession of the Falcon and Leia is, well Leia and Chewie still snarls a lot. What this novel does well is set a good fast pace of activities in the Star Wars universe and really fill in how Luke bui by Steve Perry, published in What this novel does well is set a good fast pace of activities in the Star Wars universe and really fill in how Luke built his new light saber and what Leia and Chewie and Lando did between movies.

And as far as that goes a pretty decent job was done. I thought the Clone Wars were long over. Perhaps the neatest creation, to give the author some credit back, is Xizor the head of Black Sun the evil underground crime network of the Star Wars Universe - if you are a super geek you will also know that there was a plastic model kit made of Xizor, an actual full length movie soundtrack and other marketing goodies just like it was an actual movie release.

So, back to Xizor. Pretty decent character as far as evil characters go; ruthless, charming and reptilian with a juiced up pheremone system to drive all the humanoid ladies wild when he so chooses - no really.

The actual writing itself left me a bit annoyed. The sentences are too damn short. And repetitive. And too melodrama. Just too much. Way too much. Really too much, it was. If you follow me.

Overall a worthwhile bit of time spent with your favourite Star Wars characters. I really would have liked to not see Dash Rendar though - the Han Solo clone.

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I leave it up to you. If you are a Star Wars geek you will likely need to read this book since it ties up a bunch of activities between movies and is treated as official Star Wars Universe stuff.

If you just like the movies the first three produced, not the last three you can skip this book and never knew it existed. May the. Nope, not gonna do it. Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire is a story from the pre-Disney Legends continuity. They are joined by the Corellian smuggler Dash Rendar, who shares suspiciously similar characteristics to Han Solo, except he has an even Star Wars: They are joined by the Corellian smuggler Dash Rendar, who shares suspiciously similar characteristics to Han Solo, except he has an even bigger ego, and a slightly newer ship.

On the opposing side is Darth Vader, still obsessed with finding young Skywalker and seducing him to the Dark Side of the Force. My history with this book goes back to , when it was one of the earliest of the second wave of Expanded Universe novels that began with Heir to the Empire.

I bought the PC version of the game, but my computer was too underpowered to play it I lacked a 3D accelerator! I thus had to settle with just the novel and the soundtrack. This book is The plot moves at a fair pace, and there are action scenes aplenty that satisfy my Star Wars craving after recently having read Star Wars: Star Wars storytelling. No opportunity to describe a woman in terms of physical attractiveness is missed, and that is exemplified in the form of the android gynoid?

Star Wars meets the Stepford Wives. Too often Leia is treated as luggage, or as a prize to be won, or as a problem to be solved. This is done by both the heroes and the villains, making it a writing problem. This is not on show here—like Dave Wolverton before him, Steve Perry has a fundamental misunderstanding of what makes Leia a compelling character: At least she gets to give him a good kick in the gonads.

Beyond the portrayal of women, there are other negatives that should be mentioned. The characterisation of Luke is all wrong—he acts more like Wormie from the original Star Wars novel, not like the Jedi Knight-in-training who learnt from Yoda and survived a duel with Darth Vader.

It is hard to credit that this is supposed to be the character who, in less than a year, will show maturity enough to resist the pull of the Dark Side when facing the Emperor. Further—the Emperor seems to be written as if he is some sort of hippy youth group leader. How are things there? Example A: He is bald. He has teeth made of polished black chrome. This is both lazy and a juvenile attempt at a slur, and unnecessarily mean-spirited. Example B: Especially considering the character mentioned later called Mayli Weng, who represents the Exotic Entertainers Union—the author is wearing stereotypes on his sleeves for all to see.

The scene of Vader inside his hyperbaric chamber using the Dark Side to heal his injuries is a great concept that really gets to the heart of who Darth Vader is—powerful enough to restore himself, but still Anakin enough to feel elation and joy at the rejuvenation, which paradoxically breaks the Dark Side spell and returns him to his ruined state.

Also, while Xizor is a totally hokey villain, he is also really enjoyable as someone with Olympian levels of self-confidence who is happy to crush all opposition with a fat wad of cash and a sexy android.

He is certainly refreshing after having Hutts as the bog-standard gangster in every other Star Wars tale. It is far too flawed for that. This makes him a great videogame protagonist, but an insufferable character in a novel. The much vaunted Bothan spy network makes an appearance, sending a secret message to Leia secured with the almost inconceivably difficult-to-guess password: No wonder so many of them died bringing news of the second Death Star if that is all the cunning they can muster.

A further thought—towards the end of the novel there is a scene where Rogue Squadron show up, and three of them are described as being distraught or disabled, and Perry writes Wedge as totally unbothered.

It certainly is a difference from the X-wing novels where Wedge quite rightly agonises over every loss to his squadron. Star Wars books can be tonally weird. So, enjoyable despite some eye-rollingly bad moments. Not a trainwreck, but certainly not a triumph. Recommended for fans of Star Wars, as well as fans of space opera in general. Jun 11, Adam rated it it was ok Shelves: I'd heard good things about SoTE, had fond memories of the game, and honestly thought the plot sounded pretty good in summary.

Unfortunately, Steve Perry's execution of it was terrifically worthless. This is generally a bad way to design characters. I realize there is a fine line between repetitious, predictable tropes and the archet I'd heard good things about SoTE, had fond memories of the game, and honestly thought the plot sounded pretty good in summary. I realize there is a fine line between repetitious, predictable tropes and the archetypes and mythological patterns that are central to SW, but it seems like the editors could have kept this piece of clumsy fan-fiction grade writing off the shelves.

Every character is motivated by murdered family members, everyone is a played-out stereotype of a character with a few major traits that are turned up to the max, and all the action occurs in bursts of stereotyped scenes - chase scenes, fight scenes, etc, which all end predictably and follow the patterns. Nor are the plot arcs really developed in a way that emphasizes their relative importance.

The Suprosa bit, crucial to setting up ROTJ, came out of nowhere, went by quickly and without much attention, and didn't give me any reason to care about the Bothan pilots. So what if half the squadron died, and they were rookies? If it had been a larger battle, and they'd been members of a no-name random x-wing squadron, they'd never get mentioned again. Another reviewer made some comment to the effect that, if you're picking a star wars novel, you can't be expecting "existential philosophy.

The KOTOR games, Matthew Stover's novels, as well as select other novels written by people who care and know how to write, and also including the excellent essential guides and rpg sourcebooks written by people who care as much or more, have done great things for the quality of new Star Wars stories.

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Enjoy one of them, and don't bother with SoTE. Read a summary instead. Jul 22, Scott Rhee rated it really liked it Shelves: I can easily guess why George Lucas never went on to make his planned third trilogy Episodes by perusing the sci-fi section of any bookstore: There are a slew of other writers who have carried on the Star Wars mythos. Probably better than Lucas's movies would have been, in my opinion. I have read a small handful of the Star Wars novels, and some are better than others.

Back in the mid-'90s, best-selling sci-fi author Steve Perry jumped on the Star Wars bandwagon with hi I can easily guess why George Lucas never went on to make his planned third trilogy Episodes by perusing the sci-fi section of any bookstore: Back in the mid-'90s, best-selling sci-fi author Steve Perry jumped on the Star Wars bandwagon with his novel "Shadows of the Empire", a continuation of the events of Episode V: Return of the Jedi.

It's basically a filler novel, completely superfluous, but entertaining nonetheless. It's also one of the better Star Wars novels I have read, second only to the terrific Timothy Zahn three-book series.

Perry's book does several things well: A good read for uber-geeks like me who love Star Wars.

May 05, Matt rated it it was ok. This was my first foray into reading a genre book from a franchise. I've been watching the original Star Wars films with my daughter. I like to try things I wouldn't normally do and reading a Star Wars book is definitely one of them.

The writing was all over the place in quality, in my opinion. There'd be passa This was my first foray into reading a genre book from a franchise. There'd be passages where the content masked the simplistic writing, but once the story was mired down in an action sequence, the whole thing just got ridiculous.

I don't think I'd ever seen exclamation points outside of dialogue in a book that wasn't aimed at children. All in all, I don't regret reading it, but don't think I'll come back to the SW literary galaxy anytime soon.

View all 4 comments. Dec 31, Jeffrey rated it really liked it Shelves: Good solid airplane fun reading. The usual Star Wars cliches and weaknesses apply, but what were you expecting from a Star Wars novel, existential philosophy?

It's fun seeing Luke, Leia et. The characters are a bit more vulnerable and human than in other books this book has more "adult situations" than all the others combined, but that isn't saying much , so it's c Good solid airplane fun reading. The characters are a bit more vulnerable and human than in other books this book has more "adult situations" than all the others combined, but that isn't saying much , so it's certainly worthwhile if you're a Star Wars fan.

Mar 30, Brooke rated it really liked it Shelves: I worried about how it would hold up, wondered how much I'd forgotten, and was curious to see how it slotted into all the prequels and novels that have since come out. It's hard to deny that there's something about Shadows that is just classic - it at least used to be one of the more well known EU titles, and it fills in wh 3. It's hard to deny that there's something about Shadows that is just classic - it at least used to be one of the more well known EU titles, and it fills in what happens to Luke, Leia, Chewie, Lando, Artoo, and Threepio in the interim between The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi.

The book centers around the introduction of a character who was created by Steve Perry, Prince Xizor, a Falleen crime lord who serves as a rival to Darth Vader for the Emperor's favor. Just as before, I really enjoyed watching Vader contend with this sort of competition, and I feel like the moments of insight we get into Vader's mind really do mesh with the man who was Anakin Skywalker that we came to know in the prequels.

Perry does a fantastic job of capturing every character's voice from the films, which is definitely the most enjoyable aspect of the book.

It exists in that awkward period of time in which Leia and Luke still are nursing a lot of confused sexual tension with each other, but I think it manages to handle it well, as they struggle to figure out exactly what it is that they feel for each other, without it ever venturing too far off into the weirdly taboo. The action is great, the humor is there, the feel is unmistakably Star Wars, and it's definitely an enjoyable ride.

I think there are three points worth mentioning that are arguably rocky. They very specifically wanted to contrast him to Han, and I actually do appreciate the ways in which they did - by creating a character who is a swaggering mercenary-minded jackass and acknowledging that they were creating someone who was supposed to be very DIFFERENT from Han, there's a recognition that a lot of the tropes that are often ascribed to Han Solo by fanboys are just not actual aspects of his character.

They are, however, part of Dash, but it still reads like he's a poor man's Han, living in his shadow and existing to fill in the 'gap' in the trio.

I really wish, honestly, that Perry would have just let Lando do the job - some of my favorite parts of the book involve watching Lando's friendship with Leia and Luke evolve in the wake of his 'betrayal' on Cloud City. I have a lot of problems with the term Mary Sue, but I'm not fond of the term Gary Stu either, and that's something that Xizor gets accused of being often. It's easy to see why the writing revolving around him makes some people cringe: There's that whole 'secretes pheromones' thing that seems like it jumped right off the pages of a 15 year old's fanfiction.

We can talk about characters who are impossibly perfect, but the fact of the matter is Xizor's hubris is his number one weakness, and never is that more well-illustrated in the very narration of his thoughts about himself. Of course Xizor sounds perfect - he is fully convinced that he is. But clearly, when he is foiled by Leia, then Luke, then Vader, he is anything but. This is definitely a conflicting book to read for Leia fans: Perry spends a lot of time in her head, which is appreciable, and he doesn't do a terrible job of it - while she does often think about her romantic feelings for Luke and Han, they aren't her primary concern and she more often than not chastises herself not to think about them right now, showing that she has her priorities well in order.

But this is also definitely the EU book where Leia is sexualized the most: Xizor becomes sexually obsessed with Leia and spends most of the book trying to "seduce" her.

There's no disguising the non-consensual nature of this whole situation, and I wish that Leia had been allowed to snap out of it without any assistance from Chewbacca. Her 'strong will' in the face of Xizor's willingness to basically drug her into submission is repeatedly pointed out, but there's just as much overindulgent internal narrative where she's starting to fall prey to said pheromones, and it's all kind of embarrassing when you consider how Leia got to at least openly murder Jabba when he tried to sexually control her.

As a 12 year old girl, it was all a little titillating to read, if only because we don't see a lot in the way of sex in Star Wars novels period, but it's also unfortunate that one of the few times we do, it's an attempted rape of Leia. All that in mind, I do really like Shadows, and it stood up to the test of time, and slots in well with the canon still. We get to see a side of Vader that we don't often, and the development of the relationships between film characters makes this an important EU read, in my opinion, if not an example of its best writing.

Sep 27, Paul Heingarten rated it really liked it. Interesting narrative that fits pretty snug between Episodes V and VI. It was fun for me getting into the story and the heads of Luke, Leia, and even Lando as they piece together the eventual rescue of Han as well as deal with a number of twists and other adversaries in their way.

The treatment of the characters is pretty faithful to their on-screen personas, a fan of the Star Wars saga should enjoy this one. Jul 15, Amanda Thompson rated it liked it Shelves: I wasn't sure about this one because some reviews said it was 'a must for all Star Wars fans! If you're into Star Wars fiction, it's worth a read, but I do think the quality is on the mediocre scale. The story itself is fun, and they get enough content in there to make it its own story, not just a 'filler'.

The villain, Prince Xizor, head of the Black Sun crime syndicate, is interesting, and I liked his rivalry w I wasn't sure about this one because some reviews said it was 'a must for all Star Wars fans! The villain, Prince Xizor, head of the Black Sun crime syndicate, is interesting, and I liked his rivalry with Vader because it makes Vader more interesting , but Xizor's bits did tend to be long-winded. His POV sections and monologues could have been paired down a lot.

It was made a little less irksome because Luke and Leia are constantly comparing him to Han, so their similarities are noted, and he was kind of fun, but I honestly would have liked it better if the twist was he genuinely only cared about getting paid. As it stood, it felt rather like a carbon copy. Speaking of Han, one thing I really liked is Leia struggling with this question of what might happen after they -if they ever- free Han.

She loves him. She's head over heels in love with him. She told him so. And he said 'I know. I just loved this, because it's completely genuine.

And speaking of feelings, Perry had fun messing with readers. This is before Luke and Leia are twins, right? And Luke still totally has a crush on Leia, right?Palpatine then reminds Vader that Xizor controls the largest merchant fleet in the galaxy, and thus could be useful for them.

Other writing credits include articles, reviews, and essays, animated teleplays, and some unproduced movie scripts.

Ross Hamilton rated it liked it Jul 24, George R. I thought the Clone Wars were long over. Star Wars Legends has been added Shadows of the Empire: Erik Dionne rated it it was amazing Apr 04, Chrome On the Control button top right of browser , select Settings from dropdown.

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GWENDA from Eugene
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